TREE FAQs

WHAT ARE THE DATES OF THE 2022 TREE SALE?

The 2022 tree sale will run from November 26, 2021 until we sell out – usually by mid-February.  Trees are expected to be available for pickup on Saturday, May 14, 2022, from 9 am to noon, at Soho’s Greenhouse, 43 Bedford Street, in Westport. 

IS THERE ANY RUSH?

Nurseries across the country have been hard-hit over the past two years by COVID-related shortages of supplies and manpower, and trees are in particularly short supply this year.  As a result, we’re recommending that you order as early as possible, since we may not be able to restock once our initial order is sold out.

HOW DO I ORDER?

Browse through our tree listings under the TREES tab, or download the “TREES 2022” catalogue there.

To order, simply email westportinbloom@gmail.com with the names of the trees you’d like. You will receive a return email confirming the trees’ availability and the total cost. (And we charge no tax!)

To pay, send an e-transfer to westportinbloom@gmail.com. NO PASSWORD is required.
You can also pay by cheque to Westport in Bloom, c/o Donna Easter, PO Box 367, Westport ON, K0G 1X0.

Don’t forget to include your telephone number with your order – we’ll need it to contact you if you forget to pick up your tree in May. And please be sure to give us the name you want on your order: if you order under your married name, for instance, but use another name on your cheque or email, we may get confused!

WHEN AND WHERE WILL MY TREE ARRIVE?

Our trees will be available for pickup on Saturday, May 14, 2022, from 9 am to noon, probably at Soho’s Greenhouse, 43 Bedford Street, in Westport.  Don’t worry, we’ll let you know in plenty of time!

WHAT ARE BAREROOT TREES?

Most of our trees arrive in bareroot form, with their roots bagged in plastic, rather than heavy pots of soil.  As a result, they are light to carry and easy to plant.  Bareroot trees can have a root mass up to 200% larger than the roots of a balled-and-burlapped or container tree, and they become established more quickly after transplanting.  For detailed planting instructions, download our PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS here:

Planting Instructions

or see HOW SHOULD I PLANT MY TREE?, below.

WHAT ARE PLANT HARDINESS ZONES?

Canada’s plant hardiness zones identify the areas where different trees and plants will probably survive. While US planting zones are based solely on minimum winter temperatures, Canadian planting zones are based on a wide range of climate conditions, including year-round maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, wind and frost-free period. The harshest zone is 0, and the mildest is 8.  Westport was previously classified as zone 5a but, as a result of climate change, is now considered zone 5b (slightly more moderate). 

Find the hardiness zone for your own municipality on this Government of Canada website: http://www.planthardiness.gc.ca/?m=22&lang=en. In some cases, sheltered areas of your property may be able to support trees that would not normally survive in your official zone.

HOW BIG WILL MY TREE BE ON ARRIVAL?

The approximate size of the tree you will receive is shown in our catalogue listings under the colour photo.  More often than not, the trees our supplier sends us are significantly larger than indicated.

DO I NEED TWO FRUIT TREES TO GET FRUIT?

Most fruit trees require a different variety of the same kind of tree within a maximum of 200 feet.  Our 4-in-1 pear and plum trees, of course, are self-pollinating.  Bartlett pears and some apple trees will self-pollinate, but the crop will be heavier and more reliable if they have company.  Crabapples with white blossoms make excellent pollinators for apple trees, and a beehive in the area can only help!

WHAT IS A 4-IN-1 TREE?

This year we are offering two kinds of 4-in-1 (multiple-budded combination) trees: one that has been grafted with 4 different varieties of European pears and one with 4 different varieties of hardy plums.  The different varieties will pollinate one another and bear fruit at different times, allowing for more variety and a longer harvest period from a single tree.

Multiple-budded trees do require a little extra care, particularly in terms of pruning.  First of all, the smallest limb should be planted facing south/southwest to ensure that it gets plenty of sun.  Then periodically prune back the more aggressive limb or limbs.  Do NOT let one variety take over, or the others may fail.  Summer-prune as required to ensure that all the different varieties receive the same amount of sun.  Even exposure to sunlight and periodic pruning will keep each variety growing in balance with the others.

HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I HAVE FRUIT ON MY TREE?

Fruit trees are generally 3 to 6 years old before they start to bear fruit.  Given good conditions and proper care, our trees should begin producing in 2 or 3 summers, since they have already been growing for several years.

WHERE SHOULD I PLANT MY TREE?

Before you plant, make sure that you’re well away from water, sewer, septic and gas lines, to avoid costly problems in the future.   And make sure that your tree is not in a location that will interfere with overhead wires as it grows.

WHERE CAN I PLANT A WILLOW TREE?

Willows are happiest in damp or low-lying areas, and can make a soggy part of your lawn usable again by soaking up extra water.  They should not be planted within 50 feet of water or sewer lines, although this is a less serious problem with modern PVC pipe than it once was.  They are a beautiful tree in a large landscape, but they do need space. 

HOW SHOULD I PLANT MY TREE? 

Planting Instructions

  • Plant your tree as soon as possible. Keep it in a cool, shady place and water for a day or two if necessary, but do NOT let the roots dry out.
  • Plant away from utilities, septic systems and buildings.
  • Dig a square or irregular saucer-shaped hole as deep as the root ball and twice as wide, with a loose mound of soil in the centre. Rough up the exposed soil to encourage root penetration. 
  • Remove the plastic bag or container. If your container tree is root-bound, cut an X in the base of the root ball and four vertical slices along the sides, using a sharp knife.
  • Trim any broken twigs or root ends, but not the central leader.
  • Place the tree on the mound of soil in the hole, with the roots draping freely over it. Anchor with 6 inches of soil.
  • Mix the small envelope of Root Rescue (mycorrhizae root stimulant) with 2 gallons of water, and pour over the roots as soil is added to the hole.
  • Soak the soil thoroughly until the mud is the consistency of stew and flows around the roots, and jiggle the tree up and down to remove air pockets.
  • Check that the trunk is vertical, and that the soil line on the trunk, or the spot where the topmost root meets the trunk, is 1 or 2 inches above the undisturbed soil around the tree (it will settle). Pack the soil lightly with your heel.
  • Build a water ring about 3 inches high around the edge of the planting hole and fill with water. The ring can be removed next year.
  • Spread about 2 inches of mulch over the area, but keep the mulch 3-4 inches away from the tree trunk to prevent disease.
  • During the first season, after the tree leafs out, water it for 5-6 minutes once a week or until the soil is saturated, even if it rains.

CONGRATULATIONS – you’ve planted a legacy!

ANY GUARANTEE?

Sorry, no guarantees or refunds. Trees well-watered and properly cared for will have an
excellent survival rate – but unfortunately, we have no control over Mother Nature, and no profit margin: every penny we earn goes into helping keep our village beautiful. Thank you for your understanding, and thank you for supporting Westport in Bloom!